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RN Nursing Programs in Vermont - VT

How to Become an RN in Vermont

The faster way to become a Registered Nurse in Vermont is via an Associate Degree, Nursing (ADN), which is a two year program. The longer option is a four year Bachelor’s Degree, Nursing (BSN). However, the two programs are similar in many respects: before applying to a school of nursing, both degrees require around 10 prerequisite courses in general studies, which usually include microbiology, physiology, psychology, math, English and so forth—communications and baseline science courses, essentially.

Upon entrance into either program, curriculum focus upon building baseline nursing knowledge with regards to diagnosis, treatment, care and so forth. Where the two programs differ, though, is in that a BSN offers two extra years to pursue advanced, targeted studies in particular areas of interest, like pharmacology, pediatrics (child medicine), radiology, and so forth, as well as take a wider range of electives. This prepares graduates for more advanced, specialized positions upon graduation, and also provides the option to continue with graduate studies and become an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, or even pursue a Master’s Degree in Nursing.

The final test to become a Registered Nurse, no matter which program one chooses, is the NCLEX-RN, which is a nationally-standardized Registered Nurse licensure exam. Students apply to the Vermont State Board of Nursing and pay a $90 application fee, and then take the NLCEX-RN via Pearson Vue for $200. Close to 90 percent of student pass the exam on their first try and receive their Registered Nurse license within two weeks.

RN Salary and Jobs in Vermont

Vermont RNs mostly work in hospitals, with private clinics and doctor’s offices being their other major employers, and they take home an average annual income of $64,000 (according to BLS.gov) plus benefits. Registered Nurses work as part of a team, identifying health issues, and managing plans of patient care in conjunction with nurse aides and physicians. They may be asked to do so at all hours of the day—after all health care is a 24 hour per day pursuit.