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Utah, UT - RN to BSN Nursing School Program

How to Become an RN in Utah

There are two different degrees that can lead to Registered Nurse licensure in Utah. The shorter Associate Degree, Nursing (ADN), is a two year program, while the longer option is a four year Bachelor’s Degree, Nursing (BSN). The two programs are similar in many respects: before applying to a school of nursing, both degrees require around 10 prerequisite courses in general studies, which usually include physiology, psychology, biology, and other similar classes. And the course work in both programs, as it is preparing students for the same licensure examination, covers the same ground in terms of baseline nursing skills, practice and concepts. Where the two programs differ, though, is that a BSN offers two extra years to pursue advanced, targeted studies in particular areas of interest, like maternity, anesthesia, and so forth. The opportunity for specialization and advanced nursing skills and knowledge of a BSN are what leads half of the RN students in Utah down the longer path—it can lead to more fulfilling careers and higher paying jobs down the road and can also lead students to graduate studies and licensure as certified anesthetists or Advanced Practice Nurses.

The final test to become a Registered Nurse and follows either an ADN or a BSN is the NCLEX-RN, which is a nationally-standardized Registered Nurse licensure exam. Students apply to the Utah Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing and pay a $95 application and fingerprinting fee, which is for an FBI criminal background check, then take the $200 NLCEX-RN via Pearson Vue. Close to 90 percent of student pass the exam on their first try and receive their Registered Nurse license within two weeks.

RN Salary and Jobs in Utah

A Registered Nurse in a Utah city such as Salt Lake City can expect to earn an average yearly salary of close to $62,500 plus benefits, with nurses in outlying areas like Ogden and Provo averaging around $60,000 annually (according to BLS.gov). Their main employers are hospitals, and clinics, doctor’s office and nursing homes also have high demand for RNs. In all these setting, Registered Nurses work as part of a team, identifying health issues, and managing plans of patient care in conjunction with nurse aides and physicians.