Nursing Credentials
Search Nursing By State
Search Nursing By Career
Search CNA by Category
Spotlight Schools

 

RN Nursing Programs in Oregon - OR

How to Become an RN in Oregon

There are two possible routes to becoming a Registered Nurse in Oregon: a two year Associate Degree, Nursing (ADN) program, or a four year Bachelor’s Degree, Nursing (BSN)—it is also possible to pursue licensure via a hospital-based diploma program, but these are few and far between. Both an ADN and a BSN can only be applied for once about a year of prerequisite courses like math, biology, English and psychology have been completed.

The two programs see very similar enrollment numbers. Although there is little difference in subject matter—most of the classes in both a BSN and an ADN cover nursing theory and practice—a BSN offers much greater opportunity for electives and specialization because of the additional two years of study. Furthermore, because BSNs are usually offered by larger universities, there are often more diverse elective options to expand knowledge beyond direct nursing studies. RNs with a BSN graduate with a breadth of knowledge that allows them to apply nursing practice to a wider variety of situations and occupations.

Nurse licensure at the end of either program takes place via the NCLEX-RN test. It is given by Pearson Vue and costs $200. In addition, the Oregon State Board of Nursing charges a $160 application fee and requires fingerprinting a t a cost of $52. It is an intensive, comprehensive exam, and students who pass the test—as is the case for 90 percent of graduating nursing students—emerge with no doubt that they are ready to begin work as an Oregon Registered Nurse.

RN Salary and Jobs in Oregon

The average yearly income for a Registered Nurse in Oregon cities like Portland is $67,500 (according to BLS.gov) and several thousand less in smaller towns like Medford. Nurses in the state usually work in hospitals, but there are other opportunities in retirement homes, x-ray clinics, doctor’s offices, the education system, with pharmaceutical companies and more. Indeed, their typical duties can sometimes vary, but, for most Registered Nurses, work typically revolves around analyzing patient health and devising a plan of action in conjunction with doctors and nursing assistants. Working in various departments within a hospital and beyond, this can mean a nurse can pursue work in a wide array of streams, from child care to maternal care to elder care, anesthesia, and many other streams. It is this flexibility to choose a specialty that makes pursuing licensure as a Registered Nurse much more attractive than becoming an LPN, CNA, or other lesser-qualified nursing position—not to mention the financial benefits.