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RN Nursing Programs in Oklahoma - OK

How to Become an RN in Oklahoma

The two most common routes to Registered Nurse licensure in Oklahoma are via the shorter Associate Degree, Nursing (ADN) program—a two year program—and the longer Bachelor’s Degree, Nursing (BSN), which takes four years to finish. Both require around ten pre-nursing courses in general science course like math and biology, and also in liberal arts that focus on mental health and communication like English and psychology.

Enrollment in the two year Associate Degree of Nursing program is a little higher than in the Bachelor Degree option, but it is worth considering a four year BSN as well. Although there is little difference in subject matter—most of the classes in both a BSN and an ADN cover nursing theory and practice—a BSN offers much greater opportunity for electives through the extra time allotted and the fact that they typically take place at larger universities with a wider variety of departments to study various realms of psychology, legal issues in health, sociology and beyond. RNs with a BSN graduate with a breadth of knowledge that allows them to apply nursing practice to a wider variety of situations and occupations.

Both a Bachelor’s Degree and an Associate’s Degree of Nursing end in the same nationally-standardized test known as the NCLEX-RN. It is administered by a national examining body called Pearson Vue to ensure standardization, and costs $200. In addition, the Oklahoma Board of Nursing requires application for the exam and proof of completion of a state-approved Registered Nurse education program, and charges $85 to process the application. Once approved and the test has been passed—just under ninety percent of first timers are successful—a student becomes licensed as a Registered Nurse in an Oklahoma and is free to begin pursuing their career of choice.

RN Salary and Jobs in Oklahoma

Wages for Registered Nurses in Oklahoma are very attractive—around $59,000 per year (according to BLS.gov) is simply average in cities such as Oklahoma City. RNs in the state typically find themselves working in hospitals, but there are other opportunities in retirement facilities, private clinics, in the education system and beyond. Thus, their range of duties can vary, but it usually involves assessment and analysis of patient health and devising a plan of action in conjunction with doctors and nursing assistants.