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RN Nursing Programs in Mississippi - MS

How to Become an RN in Mississippi

Aspiring Registered Nurses in Mississippi typically choose one of two education programs: an ADN or a BSN. An Associate Degree, Nursing, or ADN, takes around three years and is the faster option. After taking around 10 prerequisite courses in general studies, like intro psychology and physiology—prerequisites which are required for a BSN as well—students take core courses in nursing care, which are rounded out by sociology, psychology, statistics, physiology, and anatomy classes among others. This is also pretty similar to the first two years of a Bachelor of Science, Nursing, or BSN, which takes closer to four or five years, once you account for prerequisites. However, an ADN focuses a bit more on practical training, as there is little time to study in-depth theory and electives. Where ADNs leave off, a BSN picks up with advanced training in both nursing practice and theory, but also targeted research-specific courses in areas like pharmacology and public health, as well as courses in strategic nurse management and more, which prepare them for higher-level management and specialized research positions both within and outside of direct health care settings.

Students take the same final test after completing either degree: the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN), at a cost of $200 to administrators Pearson Vue and a $100 application fee paid to the Mississippi Board of Nursing. Although it varies by program, more than four out of every five first-time test taker receives a passing grade, the last step to licensure and work as a Registered Nurse in Mississippi.

RN Jobs in Mississippi: Salary, Hours and Duties

The average salary for Registered Nurses in urban areas of Mississippi is close to $56,000 per year (according to BLS.gov) not including benefits. They work hard for their wages, sometimes being asked to come in nights, weekends, and work long hours. The majority of RNs in Mississippi work in hospitals, where, in conjunction with doctors and nursing assistants, they create and modify patient care strategies for each individual case. Those who work outside of the hospital in such settings as a physician’s office, retirement home, or other health care institution may not handle as many cases as those in hospitals, but they are still called upon to think critically about their patient’s needs and juggle multiple problems at once. Indeed, for those looking for a fast-paced and rewarding career, becoming a Registered Nurse in Mississippi is an attractive option.