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RN Nursing Programs in Kansas - KS

How to Become an RN in Kansas

There are two common routes to becoming a Registered Nurse in Kansas, and about half of the students choose each one. An Associate Degree, Nursing, or ADN takes as little as two years. Entry typically requires several prerequisite courses, which can be as little as 10 credit hours, or as much as 30 based upon which school you choose. This goes for both an ADN and the other common education program to become a Registered Nurse: a BSN. A Bachelor of Science, Nursing, or BSN, takes closer to four or five years. However, it is popular because it provides a baccalaureate degree and the opportunity to engage with advanced topics in nursing that lead to dynamic career options.

During the two preliminary years of either an ADN or a BSN courses are somewhat similar: core courses in nursing care are complemented with lower-level sociology, psychology, microbiology and physiology, as well as the option to study maternity, gerontology and other topics. Where ADNs finish, a BSN moves into advanced studies in managerial processes, nursing process, theories and practices; these are complemented with specific topics like pharmacology, nursing research, acute needs and so on.

In both a BSN and an ADN it is possible to complete a practicum in which students gain valuable work experience. And both prepare students for licensure through the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN). A comprehensive test of nursing skills and knowledge, the test is administered by Pearson Vue at a cost of $200 and the Kansas State Board of Nursing also charges a $50 application fee. Once passed—close to 85 percent of first time applicants pass the exam—graduates enter the largest group of health care professionals in the United States: Registered Nurses.

RN Jobs in Kansas: Salary, Hours and Duties

For Registered Nurses in Kansas, a full time salary around $63,000 (according to BLS.gov) is normal in the bigger cities, a little less in rural areas and smaller towns. The hours do not fit a typical schedule, though. But the work is also variable—it is quite uncommon for a nurse to do the same thing day after day, as they are faced with unique patient needs from shift to shift. Essentially, RNs work with doctors and lesser-qualified nurses in an ongoing process of assessment and adjustment to their patient’s plans of care. Whether working in doctor’s office or retirement homes, or hospitals—where around 60 percent of RNs find jobs—a career as a Registered Nurse in Kansas pays well and can be very satisfying on a personal level.